Africa is not a garbage box

Africa is not a garbage box.

You think about about Africa only when you have been rejected everywhere else.

You become panafricanist when you got into trouble, can’t find a job, got discriminated, and your old friends are no where to be found.

You want to marry African women now because you have been disappointed by other race women. Who told you our women are second hand spouses?

You want to return to Africa because you have failed in foreign land, and have to run away!

For you Africa is a garbage box where the broken souls finds hope.

Africa is never your first choice, but your despair solace.

You want to return only after retiring and become unwanted in the other lands, and afraid of their elderly death row houses.

Who told you Africa is a retirement house?

You have spent your most productive years serving others, and would bring to Africa only the old and diying body and mind.

For the rejected, the desperate, the broken, the hopeless Africa offers a home.

Is Africa a garbage collector?

Bring your youth to Africa.
Make Africa your first, and last love.
Be African by choice not out of despair.

Love Africa.

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About Mawuna KOUTONIN

Mawuna Koutonin is a world peace activist who relentlessly works to empower people to express their full potential and pursue their dreams, regardless of their background. He is the Editior of SiliconAfrica.com, Founder of Goodbuzz.net, and Social activist for Africa Renaissance. Koutonin’s ultimate dream is to open a world-class human potential development school in Africa in 2017. If you are interested in learning more about this venture or Koutonin’s other projects, you can reach him directly by emailing at mk@linkcrafter.com.

2 Responses to “Africa is not a garbage box”

  1. Steven

    Some of us “black folks” living in the United States have recently come to realize that for many years we assimilated to European Western culture as a means of survival as we had been taught by our American born parents. We were blinded by this assimilation. As children, we were taught European history and had no knowledge of our own history other than being told our ancestors were slaves, eventually freed and given a better way of life in America. We have been programmed for many, many years oblivious to our heritage and its importance in knowing who we really are as a people. Second class citizenship was how we were taught to live and survive.

    I am 51 and until approx. 5 years ago, I was one of the blind. However, I am no longer blind thanks to in part the internet. Access to information of truth has helped me learn, appreciate and love my African heritage. I am also proud to pass this knowledge on to my children as it had never been done for me by my parents. It has also provided me with knowledge of the deep-seeded hatred of African-Americans in the US and how we were groomed to hate ourselves. That in itself is a lot to overcome and takes years. I have come to deeply despise and hate Amerikkka.

    Although, I have never had the opportunity to visit even one country on the amazing African continent I have fallen in love with it nonetheless. I have such a yearning and desire to relocate to the Motherland, with my wife & two children aged 20 & 25. I believe we were robbed of our birthright by way of the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade. My desire to “return home” is not based on some desperate attempt to escape white-rule. It is based on the growing knowledge that it was wrong for me to be born & raised in Amerikka in the first place. Something I had no control of. It is based on the desire to have my family begin a life in the country of our ancestors, weed out the European way of life we assimilated to and begin to be true to who we really are. We want to begin to live as and build a family of true African descent.

    We have plenty to offer as a family of educators, entrepreneurs and simply downright hard workers not looking for a handout but seeking to live our lives and the lives of our future family as intended. In the land of our ancestors. I Love the African in me and desire to shed this false existence, learn all there is to know about our heritage, tradition and people then begin a life where we can be true to ourselves and our heritage. We have much to offer more than just dead-weight & garbage. We offer our lives in humility and only seek to know who we truly are and be accepted in our true home.

    Reply
  2. dorsee savage

    My cousin printed a statement on facebook one day that ” churches are just like prison; full of liars, thieves, and controlled by gays.” To which I responded that “churches are also just like prison full of hurt people who made some bad decisions and are just looking for a way out” I belive many people look to Africa out of a sense of wanting to connect. Many African-Americans go through life with a heritage sized void in their identity. We seek at first to fill this void with American dream only to become futher disillusioned by the reality that they dont give a @#$* about us. Yet even still the U.S. media is the most powerful subverter since the serpent in the garden and it tells us to believe in the lie that is America even when reality has hit us in the face, and also that its still better than the mud huts we came from in Africa. I believe that many people not out of last resort but out of the power of an indominable spirit seek out refuge in Africa, with a courage that contradicts years of indoctrination and a willingness to defy conventional assimilation and wisdom.

    Reply

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